Categories
Watercolor Techniques

What Are Watercolor Techniques

In this post, I will define what are watercolor techniques and provide a list of techniques with brief descriptions for each. Definition: A “technique” is defined as a way of carrying out a particular task, especially the execution or performance of an artistic work or a scientific procedure; a skillful or efficient way of doing or achieving something.

So, a watercolor technique is a method, procedure or process to achieve a particular desired effect when painting in watercolor. Mastering watercolor techniques gives the artist the ability to control the application of watercolors on the painting surface.

By practicing watercolor techniques you will acquire the know-how and skills to paint flat and three-dimensional shapes, textures, depict light and shadow, how to use colors and reserve white space in your composition.

Wash Techniques

  • Flat Wash Technique – creates a continuous flat color without showing evidence of brushstrokes
  • Graded Wash Technique – creates a gentle graduated dark to light effect using one color
  • Variegated Wash Technique – creates a gentle graduated blending effect using two or more colors

Wash techniques are the basic methods used for watercolor painting, and are the primary skills learned and practiced by the beginner in watercolor.

Wet & Dry Techniques

  • Wet-On-Wet Technique – water is applied to the paper first before painting watercolors on it
  • Wet-On-Dry Technique – painting watercolors on dry paper (without prewetting the paper)

Wet and dry techniques are used for laying washes and creating textural effects.

Preserving White Space

  • Planning and saving white space – determining, before starting a painting, where to leave white space in the composition, and avoiding applying watercolor to those saved white spaces
  • Resist Technique – applying waterproof materials such as masking fluid, or Frisket, masking film, and masking tape to the paper surface before painting to preserve white space

Preserving white space is essential for painting in watercolor because, unlike painting in oils, white watercolor paint is not normally used. Instead the white of the paper serves the purpose for white areas needed in a watercolor composition.

Applying Watercolor

  • Glazing Technique – layer of transparent or semi-transparent watercolor paint applied to a wet surface, then left to dry before adding the next layer of transparent or semi-transparent watercolor paint over the previous layer
  • Layering Technique – glazing layers to build depth and three-dimensional form
  • Light to Dark Technique – light watercolor applied first, then left to dry before adding darker watercolors in succession
  • Hard and Soft Edges Technique – blending a sharp edge into a blurred edge to make it appear to fade softly into the distance for perspective and three-dimensional form

These techniques for applying watercolors to paper are the basic methods for painting in watercolor.

Textural Effects

  • Drybrush Technique – painting with an almost dry brush with only paint loaded onto it
  • Granulation Technique – painting with watercolor paints that have grainy pigment particles
  • Lifting Technique – applying absorbent paper to a damp painted area to lift the watercolor
  • Salt Technique – applying salt to a damp painted area that is then left to dry before rubbing off the salt
  • Sagraffito Technique – applying a knife’s edge to a painted area to scratch out the watercolor
  • Spattering Technique – flicking paint off of a brush to create random spatters of watercolor

Textural effects are elements that are added to a watercolor composition to give it detail and depth.

Recommended

To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Paint

Which Watercolor Paints Are Transparent

I first learned which watercolor paints are transparent by reading Jim Kosvanec’s book, “Transparent Watercolor Wheel: A Logical and Easy-to-use System for Taking the Guesswork out of Mixing Colours” (affiliate link) first published by Watson-Guptill on May 1, 1994. They republished it in paperback on April 15, 2000. However, both editions are no longer in print. But, you can buy it from used book dealers on Amazon. You can also borrow a copy from your local public library.

Jim Kosvanec did extensive studies of watercolor paints and developed a color chart that categorizes color names into “rings” on a color wheel, as follows:

  • Ring 1 – Transparent Non-Staining
  • Ring 2 – Simi-Transparent Non-Staining
  • Ring 3 – Transparent Staining
  • Ring 4 – Semi-Opaque & Opaque
  • Ring 5 – Whitened & Blackened

Transparent Watercolor Colors

There are two groups of transparent watercolor colors. They are “non-staining” and “staining” found in Ring 1 and Ring 3 of Jim Kosvanec’s color wheel.

Ring 1 – Transparent Non-Staining Colors

Ring 3 – Transparent Staining Colors

Beware When Mixing Transparent Staining Colors

Transparent staining colors in Ring 3 only mix well with other staining colors in the same Ring 3. If you try to mix Ring 3 colors with Ring 1 transparent non-staining colors, the staining color will overpower the non-staining colors. They will also overpower other colors in Ring 2 and 4.

Mixing Ring 1 & Ring 2 Colors

To quote Jim on what colors mix well, he said:

Transparents mix or glaze with other transparents without restrictions. Transparents mix well with all others pigments except staining colors, which can “dye” them. Semi-transparents may be used like transparents but with more restraint.

~ Jim Kosvanec

Ring 2 – Semi-Transparent Colors

Here are the semi-transparent watercolors Jim Kosvanec classified as Ring 2 on his color wheel. These colors mix well with Ring 1 transparent colors identified above.

Recommended

I use Ring 1 transparent non-staining colors for glazing my first layers of color. Then I add colors from Ring 2 for depth and darker tones where needed. And, for my darkest darks, I use colors from Ring 3 sparingly. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Paint

What Watercolor Colors To Buy

What watercolor colors to buy is a personal choice. Experienced watercolor artists develop their own favorite color palette. But, for a beginner, you can start with the bare minimum three PRIMARY hues:

  • Yellow
  • Blue
  • Red

Having only the three primary hues, you can mix all the secondary hues and the hues that fall in-between. But, who wants to do all that mixing? So, why not buy the SECONDARY hues as well:

  • Green
  • Purple
  • Orange

The hues in-between the primary and secondary hues are called TERTIARY hues, they are:

  • Yellow-Green
  • Blue-Green
  • Blue-Purple
  • Red-Purple
  • Red-Orange
  • Yellow-Orange

All of the above consist of the 12 hues on the color wheel. Each of these hues have associated COLOR names that differ slightly depending of the watercolor manufacturer’s labeling.

What Are The Common Color Names

The following chart displays the most commonly used watercolor color names for each hue:

Watercolor Manufacturers

To see a list of well-known watercolor brands click here.

Recommended

If you are on a tight budget buy the watercolor Color Names listed above: numbers 1 to 6. My favorite brands are Winsor & Newton and Holbein. I also buy a few Blick colors. I recommend that you always buy the professional-quality watercolor paints, especially if you are planning to sell your watercolor paintings. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Ideas

Watercolor Ideas For Beginners

There are many options to choose from when looking for watercolor ideas for beginners. So, you may find it difficult or confusing trying to decide on a subject to paint. There are still life, landscape, waterscape or specific objects like flower or fruit/vegetable, etc. compositions to consider.

I am sure you have heard the expression “Do what you love.”

“To do what you love first find what you love.”

~ Amit Kalantri

How To Find What You Love

Ask yourself:

  • What are my favorite activities; things I like to do in my spare time?
  • What are my favorite places to go to; the beach, the park, etc.?
  • What objects do I enjoy observing; what brings me pleasure to look at?

Then write your answers down in a list with your most favorite thing at the top as #1. Then list the rest by priority.

Use Free Stock Photo Websites

There are several websites online where you can find images to download for free with no attribution required. These websites have a Search Box that allow you to enter your topic of interest and get results to browse. For instance, if you want to paint flowers, type “flowers” in the search box. You can even narrow the search down by color or type of flower that interests you. Here are my favorite stock photo websites:

Composition Steps

  • Download the stock photo to your computer.
  • Open the saved stock photo in your graphic software or directly on to your computer desktop.
  • Draw an outline of the image on to your watercolor paper.
  • Select your watercolor paint colors to use for your composition.
  • Begin painting.

My Favorite Thing To Paint

I love flowers, and that is what I enjoy painting the most. Using the stock photo websites mentioned above, I never run out of watercolor painting ideas. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Paint

How Watercolor Paint Is Made

Prior to the mid-18th century, watercolor artists handmade their paints by mixing powdered pigments with sugars and/or hide glues or some other binder and preservatives. Brothers William Reeves and Thomas Reeves invented the moist watercolor paint-cake in 1781, at the start of the “golden age” of English watercolor painting. The “cake” was immediately soluble when touched by a wet brush; a time-saving convenience.

William Winsor secured the patent for the metal paint tube invented by American oil painter John Goffe Rand. Winsor improved the design by adding the screw cap in 1904, and started manufacturing the Winsor & Newton moist watercolors in tubes.

Today, watercolor paints are sold in tubes and pans in a variety of sizes. Tubes are the most commonly used and are sold in sizes 5ml, 10ml, 14ml, 15ml, 21ml, and 37ml depending upon the manufacturer brand. Pans come in full-pan and half-pan sizes.

Tube Watercolor Paints

Watercolor paints in tubes are soft and moist. They are made with natural or synthetic pigments suspended in a binder of gum arabic with glycerin added as a wetting agent. By reading the label on the tube, you will discover the pigment formula number(s), transparency rating, lightfastness rating, staining property rating and an approved product seal.

Watercolor Paint Manufacturers

Here is a list of popular watercolor paint manufacturers in alphabetical order:

  • Daniel Smith (Washington USA)
  • Da Vinci (California USA)
  • Grumbacher (Massachusetts USA)
  • Holbein (Japan)
  • Rowney (Great Britain)
  • Schmincke (Germany)
  • Sennelier (France)
  • Winsor & Newton (Great Britain)
  • Yarka (Russia)

Other Watercolor Mediums

  • Gouache – an opaque watercolor with a higher pigment density and white chalk added
  • Liquid Watercolors – resembles ink and is sold in small dropper bottles
  • Watercolor Sticks – resembles crayon or pastels that can be used dry or wet
  • Watercolor Pencils – resembles a lead pencil but contains dry watercolor pigment

Recommended

My favorite manufacturers of watercolor paints are Holbein in tube size 15ml and Winsor & Newton in tube sizes 5ml, 14 ml and 37ml. I recommend and use only professional-quality watercolor paints. NOTE: Student-grade watercolor paints are mostly made of imitation pigments of low-quality. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Brushes

How Watercolor Brushes Are Made

Since prehistoric times, humans have used brush-like instruments to paint on cave walls. They most likely used sticks with the ends crushed to soften the fibers, and/or animal hair tied at the end of sticks. Until recent history, watercolor brushes were handmade by attaching animal hair to the end of wooden handles.

In the 1800s during the Industrial Age and the invention of the metal ferrule, the manufacturing of watercolor color brushes began. Today, most watercolor brushes are machine made. Top-quality watercolor brushes are still handmade.

Watercolor Brush Construction

  • Hair or synthetic fiber tip
  • Metal ferrule
  • Handle

Hair or Synthetic Fiber Tip

Watercolor brushes are made with natural sable hair, synthetic sable fibers, or nylon. The very best are made with Kolinsky sable hair from a species of weasel in Siberia.

Metal Ferrule

Fine quality watercolor brushes are mounted into ferrules made of a hard but malleable, corrosion resistant metal such as brass or copper. These are typically plated with nickel, silver or (rarely) gold. Ferrules on cheaper brushes are made of softer aluminum or tin.

Handle

Better quality watercolor brush handles are made of seasoned hardwood that is sealed and lacquered for a high-gloss waterproof finish. Cheaper, mass-produced handles are made of unfinished raw wood. There are also brush handles made of molded plastic.

Watercolor Brush Shapes

  • Round – for a variety of brush strokes with a fine tip for details.
  • Flat – for spreading paint quickly and evenly over a broad surface.
  • Mop – for broad washes, soft paint application over layers and glazing.
  • Rigger – useful for painting fine lines.

Watercolor Brush Sizes

There is a wide range of brush sizes from very small to very large, respectively: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 28, 30. The most frequently used are in the mid-size range: 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18. The size indicates the width of the hair tip. The larger the size, the broader the brush stroke will be.

Recommended

Quality watercolor brushes are expensive, but worth the investment. If you handle your brushes with care – rinse them thoroughly after a painting session, and store them flat or in an upright brush holder to dry – they will last you for many, many years. To start, I recommend buying Blick Masterstroke Finest Red Sable Brush – Round, Size 8, Short Handle. My favorite and most frequently used sable brush is a Round, Size 12, Short Handle. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Watercolor Paper

How Watercolor Paper Is Made

Prior to the 19th century, watercolor paper was handmade by processing wet pulp in a finely woven mesh screen. The process was slow and very expensive. Then in the early 1800s, an industrial paper machine was invented. The paper-making industry started mass producing mold-made watercolor papers. Now high-quality machine-made watercolor paper is readily available, as well as handmade.

Watercolor Paper Characteristics

Watercolor paper is made of cotton and/or linen rag or a blend of cotton and synthetic fibers. A gelatin sizing is added as a protective agent that makes the paper less absorbent. Watercolor paper is available in three textures: rough, hot-pressed and cold-pressed. And, it is available in several thicknesses. High-quality watercolor papers for professional (and serious student) use have the following characteristics:

  • Made of 100% cotton rag
  • Cold-press texture
  • Thickness: 140 lb., 200 lb., or 300 lb. weight

Watercolor Paper Sheet Sizes

The standard size categories for watercolor paper sheets are:

  • Royal (19 x 24 inches)
  • Imperial (22 x 30 inches); also called a “full-sheet”
  • Elephant (29 1/2 x 40 inches); and
  • Double-Elephant (40 x 60 inches)

Watercolor paper can also be purchased in pads, blocks and sketchbooks in a variety of standard sizes and paper qualities. Pads and sketchbooks are usually made of a cotton-blend watercolor paper for student use.

Watercolor Paper Manufacturers

The best, high-quality watercolor paper is produced in France, Italy and Great Britain. They are:

  • Arches made in France
  • Fabriano made in Italy
  • Lana made in France
  • T. H. Saunders made in Great Britain
  • Whatman made in Great Britain

Recommended

If you are a serious student or hobbyist who intends to show and sell your watercolor paintings, use professional-quality watercolor paper that is labeled as “100% cotton”, “archival”, and “cold-press”. The thickness (weight) should be 140 lb. or more. I only use Arches Watercolor Paper natural white full-sheet size for my paintings. To learn my process and see painting demos, I invite you to signup for my Watercolor Mini-Course. And, join my email list to help improve your painting skills. You can view my artwork on Instagram @vanissajames or by visiting my gallery website: Vanissa James Fine Art.

Categories
Color Mixing Watercolor Paint

Prussian Blue

Use Prussian Blue for Dark Backgrounds

Prussian Blue is similar to Winsor Blue, but it is a neutralized semitransparent color. I mix Prussian Blue with Alizarin Crimson and Viridian to create strong darks for backgrounds and to darken other colors.

This dark mixture is almost black, but is still transparent. I use it instead of black tube paints such as Ivory Black, Neutral Tint, Payne’s Gray, etc. which have an undesirable flat appearance.

Shop online for watercolor supplies at discount prices using my affiliate link.

Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

French Ultramarine

French Ultramarine is one of my favorite blues. It is a semiopaque, warm blue that mixes well with other transparent nonstaining colors. It is a good color to use as foreground shadows. It sits between Winsor Blue and Ultramarine Violet on the color wheel.

Burnt Sienna and Burnt Umber complement French Ultramarine when juxtaposed in a composition.

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Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

New Gamboge

New Gamboge is my favorite, warm, yellow. It sits between Aureolin and Cadmium Orange on the color wheel. Ultramarine Violet or Permanent Mauve complement New Gamboge.

I like to use it whenever a cheery yellow is called for and when creating 3-dimensional form for yellow-to-orange objects.

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Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Cadmium Scarlet

In the past, I used Cadmium Scarlet as the SECONDARY ORANGE on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below. But, now I prefer to use Cadmium-Free Scarlet because Cadmium paints are toxic.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Cadmium-Free Scarlet, the complementary color is:

Winsor Blue
Winsor Blue (Green Shade)

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Cadmium-Free Scarlet:

Manganese Blue Hue
Manganese Blue Hue

Ultramarine Violet
Ultramarine Violet

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from ORANGE to YELLOW the analogous colors for Cadmium-Free Scarlet are:

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

Aureolin
Aureolin

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three SECONDARY colors. In addition to Cadmium-Free Scarlet, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Viridian
Viridian

Permanent Mauve
Permanent Mauve

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Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Cadmium Red Deep

In the past, I used Cadmium Red Deep as the INTERMEDIATE RED-ORANGE on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below. But, now I prefer to use Cadmium-Free Red Deep because Cadmium paints are toxic.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Cadmium-Free Red Deep, the complementary color is:

Manganese Blue Hue
Manganese Blue Hue

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Cadmium-Free Red Deep:

Viridian
Viridian

Winsor Blue
Winsor Blue (Green Shade)

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from RED-ORANGE to YELLOW-ORANGE the analogous colors for Cadmium-Free Red Deep are:

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three INTERMEDIATE colors. In addition to Cadmium-Free Red Deep, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Permanent Green Light
Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

Ultramarine Violet
Ultramarine Violet

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Alizarin Crimson

I use Alizarin Crimson as the PRIMARY RED on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Alizarin Crimson, the complementary color is:

Viridian
Viridian

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Alizarin Crimson:

Permanent Green Light
Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

Manganese Blue Hue
Manganese Blue Hue

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from RED to ORANGE the analogous colors for Alizarin Crimson are:

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

Triadic

The three PRIMARY colors on the color wheel are YELLOW, BLUE and RED. In addition to Alizarin Crimson, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Aureolin
Aureolin

Winsor Blue
Winsor Blue (Green Shade)

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Winsor Violet

I use Winsor Violet as the INTERMEDIATE RED-VIOLET on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Winsor Violet, the complementary color is:

Permanent Green Light
Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Winsor Violet:

Aureolin
Aureolin

Viridian
Viridian

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from RED-VIOLET to RED-ORANGE the analogous colors for Winsor Violet are:

Alizarin Crimson
Alizarin Crimson

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three INTERMEDIATE colors. In addition to Winsor Violet, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Manganese Blue Hue
Manganese Blue Hue

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

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Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Permanent Mauve

I use Permanent Mauve as the SECONDARY VIOLET on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Permanent Mauve, the complementary color is:

Aureolin
Aureolin

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Permanent Mauve:

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

Permanent Green Light
Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from VIOLET to RED the analogous colors for Permanent Mauve are:

Winsor Violet
Winsor Violet

Alizarin Crimson
Alizarin Crimson

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three SECONDARY colors. In addition to Permanent Mauve, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Viridian
Viridian

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Ultramarine Violet

I use Ultramarine Violet as the INTERMEDIATE BLUE-VIOLET on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Ultramarine Violet, the complementary color is:

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Ultramarine Violet:

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

Aureolin
Aureolin

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from BLUE-VIOLET to RED-VIOLET the analogous colors for Ultramarine Violet are:

Permanent Mauve
Permanent Mauve

Winsor Violet
Winsor Violet

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three INTERMEDIATE colors. In addition to Ultramarine Violet, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

Permanent Green Light
Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

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Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Winsor Blue (Green Shade)

I use Winsor Blue (Green Shade) as the PRIMARY BLUE on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Winsor Blue (Green Shade), the complementary color is:

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Winsor Blue (Green Shade):

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from BLUE to VIOLET the analogous colors for Winsor Blue (Green Shade) are:

Ultramarine Violet
Ultramarine Violet

Permanent Mauve
Permanent Mauve

Triadic

The three PRIMARY colors on the color wheel are YELLOW, BLUE and RED. In addition to Winsor Blue (Green Shade), the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Aureolin
Aureolin

Alizarin Crimson
Alizarin Crimson

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Manganese Blue Hue

I use Manganese Blue Hue as the INTERMEDIATE BLUE-GREEN on the color wheel because it is a pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Manganese Blue Hue, the complementary color is:

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Manganese Blue Hue:

Alizarin Crimson
Alizarin Crimson

Cadmium Scarlet
Cadmium-Free Scarlet

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from BLUE-GREEN to BLUE-VIOLET the analogous colors for Manganese Blue Hue are:

Winsor Blue
Winsor Blue (Green Shade)

Ultramarine Violet
Ultramarine Violet

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three INTERMEDIATE colors. In addition to Manganese Blue Hue, the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Winsor Violet
Winsor Violet

Cadmium Orange
Cadmium-Free Orange

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Winsor Green (Yellow Shade)

In the past, I used Permanent Green Light (or Permanent Green #1) as the INTERMEDIATE YELLOW-GREEN on the color wheel. But, now I use Winsor Green (Yellow Shade) as the pure color that is perfect for its complementary color listed below.

Complementary

The complementary color sits on the opposite side of the color wheel. For Winsor Green (Yellow Shade), the complementary color is:

Winsor Violet
Winsor Violet

Split-Complementary

The split-complementary colors are the two colors located on either side of the complementary color on the color wheel. The following are the split-complementary colors for Winsor Green (Yellow Shade):

Permanent Mauve
Permanent Mauve

Alizarin Crimson
Alizarin Crimson

Analogous

Going clockwise on the color wheel from YELLOW-GREEN to BLUE-GREEN the analogous colors for Winsor Green (Yellow Shade) are:

Viridian
Viridian

Manganese Blue Hue
Manganese Blue Hue

Triadic

This Triadic consists of three INTERMEDIATE colors. In addition to Winsor Green (Yellow Shade), the other colors that make up this Triadic color scheme are:

Ultramarine Violet
Ultramarine Violet

Cadmium Red Deep
Cadmium-Free Red Deep

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Categories
Color Schemes Watercolor Paint

Cadmium Lemon

See Aureolin. It is the pure transparent color I use instead of Cadmium Lemon, which is opaque.

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